Calli® Concentrated Herbal Beverage

Product: Calli® Concentrated Herbal Beverage – by Sunrider International

Ingredients: Camellia Leaf, Perilla Leaf, Mori Bark Extract, Alisma Root Extract, Imperate Root and Less Than 1% Natural Flavors.

Nutritional Information: (see graphic)

Calli® Concentrated Herbal Beverage – packaging detail

Official Description: (see graphic)

Calli® Concentrated Herbal Beverage – from Sunrider International Website
Calli® Concentrated Herbal Beverage – from official product catalog

I understand not everyone enjoys long personal testimony and extensive reviews, so I will make this brief (if you want the long version, just skip down further and enjoy).

Briefing: I recommend this product if you want a healthy beverage, and you want the benefits of the natural ingredients from which it is made.

You can order it in a variety of flavors – Regular, Cinnamon, Mint, and Night – where, the Night version is made for relaxing and is made from different ingredients (Passion Flower, He Shou Wu, Jujube Seed, Poria, Camellia Leaf, Sage Root, Rose Hips, Imperate Root and Winter Melon Seed).

Where can you get it? Well, if you want to enjoy other products from Sunrider International, you can go to their official website and shop there – Sunrider Shopping and Information Link.

If you want to find other reviews, testimonials, and, possibly more competitive prices, you can find it on Amazon (the delivery is usually better from Amazon as well):

More Information: I researched and have detailed some basic information on the ingredients.

Calli® Regular, Mint & Cinnamon:

Camellia Leaf – this leaf comes from one of many varieties of evergreen shrubs or trees. For years, throughout Asian it has been used for making tea and oils. It is claimed to contribute to the elimination of free radicals in the body which assists in reducing the effects of aging, and reducing the risk of heart disease and cancer.

Camellia sinensis

Perilla Leaf – this leaf comes from a crop vegetable, popular in Asia and in the Mint family. It is claimed to be an effective antioxidant, antiallergic, anti-inflammatory, antidepressant, anorexigenic, and tumor-preventing properties (according to drugs.com).

Perilla frutescens
Perilla frutescens – photo credit: Bill and Mavis TCC BY-SA 2.0

Mori Bark Extract – as far as I can tell, this comes from the Mulberry Tree. It has been used in the past to treat various infections (bacterial, viral and fungal), as well as inflammations.

Mulberry Tree
Mulberry Tree – photo credit: Kokai – CC BY-SA 2.0

Alisma Root Extract – this comes from flowering, aquatic plant in the edible plantain family. It has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for centuries to treat conditions of the kidney, bladder and urinary tract. It is a diuretic and helps removes excess water from the body. It is also coming used to reduce bloating, rid the body of phlegm, treat diabetes, low blood-pressure, and treat diarrhea.

Alisma Plant
Alisma Plant – photo credit: Christian Fischer – CC BY-SA 3.0

Imperate Root – this comes from a weed ( imperata cylindrica ). It is used for many things, but the extract is supposed to assist in reducing the risk of cancer. It is also a diuretic, so it helps remove excess water from the body.

Imperata cylindrica
Imperata cylindrica – photo credit and CC – click here

Calli® Night

Passion Flower – this comes from a climbing vine. It is used for externally relieving burns, and inflammations, while internally it has been used for anxiety, and other “calming” or “relaxing” effects.

Passiflora incarnata
Passiflora incarnata

He Shou Wu – this comes from a flowering plant, or vine, in the same family as buckwheat. It has traditional been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to reduce aging effects, treat various conditions such hair loss and heart disease. It should be noted that there are several reports claiming it causes liver damage and over-consumption may lead to hepatitis.

Fallopia multiflora
Fallopia multiflora – photo credit: I, DoronenkoCC BY 2.5

Jujube Seed – this is a small fruit which grows on trees – it is often referred to as Chinese Date. It has been used in various forms in Asian Traditional Medicine to alleviate stress. Additionally, it is used for anti-inflammatory purposes and sometimes for infertility (there are a long list of uses here).

Jujube
Jujube

Poria – this is a fungus or mushroom. It is used widely for sleeping issues, relaxation, and digestion problems, as well as treatment for diabetes. Medical research is somewhat lacking, with the exception of animal studies – and, of course, years of tradition in China. Other use may be found here.

Perenniporia chroleuca
Perenniporia chroleuca – photo credit: Alessandro ScottiCC BY-SA 3.0

Camellia Leaf – this leaf comes from one of many varieties of evergreen shrubs or trees. For years, throughout Asian it has been used for making tea and oils. It is claimed to contribute to the elimination of free radicals in the body which assists in reducing the effects of aging, and reducing the risk of heart disease and cancer.

Sage Root – this comes from a flowering plant (I saw one reference call it a “subshrub”). There are too many traditional uses for this plant (some listed here), but it is believed to assist in brain functions. There are several conflicting reports claiming it might be neurotoxic in certain dosages.

Sage
Sage

Rose Hips – this is a part of the rose plant below the flower petals. It is used as a source of vitamin C commonly, however, due to its degenerative nature it often needs to be supplemented with manufactured resources in order to maintain its concentration and usefulness in that respect. It is used in a number of traditional treatments (which you can find here).

Rose Hips
Rose Hips – photo credit: Morn the GornCC BY-SA 3.0

Imperate Root – this comes from a weed ( imperata cylindrica ). It is used for many things, but the extract is supposed to assist in reducing the risk of cancer. It is also a diuretic, so it helps remove excess water from the body.

Winter Melon Seed – this comes from a large fruit called, obviously, a winter melon, which is native to China. It looks like a very large cucumber, and is quite popular because it is very juicy and has very few calories. The seeds are used for various treatments, most notably for digestive problems, and removing excess water, phlegm and pus from the body (other treatments are referenced here).

Winter Melon
Winter Melon – photo credit: 草花写真館 – 草花写真館

My experiences:

I have been drinking Calli® for nearly five years. I didn’t start drinking it because I wanted to lose weight, or because there just wasn’t anything else to drink; I did it because my wife ordered tons of it – she believes in it; and, it is part of her regular diet, and has been for more than a decade.

There are plenty of herbal teas (or, as so-named, herbal beverages) around. Anyone can go to the nearly any grocery store and purchase teas and herbals – prices ranging from $1 to $10.

Why in the world would anyone find it important to pay a bit more for a product, and have to wait for it to arrive by delivery? I asked this questions when I first met my wife and was introduced to the product.

I researched it, and I could almost see why, from a health standpoint, someone would value this product. What I couldn’t wrap my head around was the logistics involved – go to a website; browse the product line; order what you want; pay for it; and, finally wait for it to arrive. Now, if I were ordering a TV, or new cell phone, or even some new clothes, I can see it – but, tea (herbal food, whatever)…I didn’t see it. I spent most of my adult life in a rush – everywhere I went. Everything I did was urgent, and waiting was wasted time…and, wasted time was lost money. I know…I know people order groceries online now, and almost everything else; but, it is so simple to just pick up, what I considered comparable products, during my next visit to the grocery store. My wife wanted nothing to do with my objections.

I eventually came around and realized that the benefits from Calli® fit my lifestyle. I recommend it.

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